Frequently Asked Questions

Please find below a selection of questions that our clients frequently ask. If you are unable to find the answer that you are looking for then please give one of our Nurses a call who will be pleased to help you further.


Cats FAQs

Kittens require a course of three vaccinations starting from 8 weeks of age. This is because their immune system is not fully developed. After their third vaccination they will require an annual booster every year.

Feline viral rhinotracheitis to reduce clinical signs.
Calicivirus infection to reduce clinical signs.
Feline panleucopenia to prevent mortality and clinical signs.
Leukaemia to prevent persistent viraemia and clinical signs of the related disease.

Only if you are travelling outside of the UK.

If your cat had all three vaccinations of it’s kitten course and its first yearly booster, the vaccination will just be given as per normal to carry on. If they missed any of those first vaccinations, they will require a second booster 3-4 weeks later.

Only 5% of the flea population is on the cat at any one time. The rest are found in the surrounding environment. All pets in the house need to be treated with an appropriate flea treatment such as Advocate or Stronghold. Bedding and soft materials should be put through a hot wash cycle where appropriate. Vacuuming every day can help to remove some from the eggs from the environment. For heavy infestations, using an environmental spray for the house such as Indorex will kill off those living in the floorboards, carpet and under skirting boards.

Cats with heavy worm infestations can be seen to have a pot belly appearance and increased appetite. Occasionally worms can be seen in the faeces. Some cats won’t show any outward symptoms at all of a worm infestation, so for that reason we recommend worming regularly.

Some parasites such as ringworm, scabies and roundworm are zoonotic and can be transmitted to people. Young children are most at risk. Routine use of parasite control such as Advocate reduces this risk considerably.

Cats should come in yearly for a check up. This can be interlinked with their vaccine. Cats age 7 times faster than humans so these health checks are important. Cats over the age of 10 should be seen every 6 months.

We recommend insurance to all of our patients. Insurance provides a means to cover veterinary fees should anything go wrong. There are many insurance companies to chose from. It is always worth reading the fine print on exclusions before taking out a policy.

An annual policy will cover for a condition for 12 months and after this time the condition will be excluded. Life policies will continue to cover year after year, provided you renew your policy each year.

Cats travelling to the EU require at least a passport, rabies vaccination and a microchip. Each country will have their own individual requirements for parasite control, so it is worth checking their government website before travelling. For more information check the DEFRA website

Cats should always be secured on in a cat carrier. When travelling it is advised to cover the carrier with a blanket or a towel as this can reduce stress in cats. Cats can sometimes suffer from travel sickness, so it is advised not to feed cats 3 hours prior to travelling. Products such as Feliway can be used to reduce stress. We do not recommend the use of sedatives.

Cat boarding is a safe and effective way of looking after your cat when you are on holiday. Cats need to be up to date with their vaccinations prior to entering a boarding facility. Alternatively, ‘cat sitters’ can come to your house to feed and interact with your cat daily. Check out our pet friendly business page to find a list of catteries and cat sitters.

Letting your cat go outdoors is a great way to keep them physically and mentally stimulated, but there are some risks. If you live on or near a busy main road, traffic accidents can occur. There is also risks of cats fighting between each other. All cats should be treated on an individual basis and the pros and cons weighed up.

Dogs FAQs

Puppies are given a course of 3 vaccines starting from 8 weeks of age. After this course they will have a booster vaccine in 12 months time. After that final booster, the DHP component of the vaccine is given every 3 years. L4 and kennel cough vaccine should still be done annually.

Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus are your three main components to the vaccine we use. Bordatella and Canine Parainfluenza is covered by the kennel cough vaccine. Leptospirosis is the L4 component to the vaccine.

Only if you are travelling outside of the UK.

Provided your dog had all of its puppy vaccines a single dose of DHP and kennel cough will be given. The L4 vaccine will require a booster in 4 weeks time.

Only 5% of the flea population is on the cat at any one time. The rest are found in the surrounding environment. All pets in the house need to be treated with an appropriate flea treatment such as Advocate or Stronghold. Bedding and soft materials should be put through a hot wash cycle where appropriate. Vacuuming every day can help to remove some from the eggs from the environment. For heavy infestations, using an environmental spray for the house such as Indorex will kill off those living in the floorboards, carpet and under skirting boards.

Dogs with heavy worm infestations can be seen to have a pot belly appearance and increased appetite. Occasionally worms can be seen in the faeces. Some dogs won’t show any outward symptoms at all of a worm infestation, so for that reason we recommend worming regularly.

Some parasites such as ringworm, scabies and roundworm are zoonotic and can be transmitted to people. Young children are most at risk. Routine use of parasite control such as Advocate reduces this risk considerably.

Angiostrongylus vasorum (lungworm) resides in the heart and pulmonary arteries and can be fatal to dogs. Dogs become infected with this life-threatening parasite by swallowing infected slugs and snails. Symptoms can be varied, but can include, coughing, tiring easily, weight loss, poor appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea, excessive bleeding from minor wounds and seizures. A dog may show one or any combination of these. Lungworm is treated with monthly Advocate or Milbemax.

Dogs should come in yearly for a check up. This can be interlinked with their vaccine. Dogs age 7 times faster than humans so these health checks are important. Dogs over the age of 10 should be seen every 6 months.

We recommend insurance to all of our patients. Insurance provides a means to cover veterinary fees should anything go wrong. There are many insurance companies to chose from. It is always worth reading the fine print on exclusions before taking out a policy.

An annual policy will cover for a condition for 12 months and after this time the condition will be excluded. Life policies will continue to cover year after year, provided you renew your policy each year.

Dogs travelling to the EU require at least a passport, rabies vaccination and a microchip. Each country will have their own individual requirements for parasite control, so it is worth checking their government website before travelling. For more information check the DEFRA website

When travelling by car, dogs should be retrained by a harness which can attach to the seat belt or in a crate. Dogs should never be left loose in the car.

Kennels are a safe and effective way of looking after your dog when you are on holiday. Dogs need to be up to date with their vaccinations prior to entering a kennels facility. Alternatively, ‘dog sitters’ can come to your house to feed and interact with your dog daily. Check out our pet friendly business page to find a list of kennels and dog sitters. ;

Puppy classes are designed to boost puppies confidence by getting them used to interacting with different people and dogs from a young age. The classes are run by dog trainers or Veterinary Nurses so they include training tips and tricks too. Even if you have had dogs in the past it is still beneficial for your puppy to go as it is the safest way for them to learn good social behaviour.

Rabbits FAQs

Pet rabbits should be vaccinated routinely against both rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and myxomatosis. Both these viral diseases are widespread and endemic in wild rabbits in the United Kingdom are are likely to prove fatal in unprotected rabbits if they are exposed. There is no effective treatment for either disease . RHD is spread by direct contact between rabbits but also via indirect contact from contaminated environments and also via mechanical transfer from insects . Myxomatosis is commonly spread by fleas and other biting insects and but can also be transmitted by direct contact with other infected rabbits.

Yes, but not all pet rabbits are the same. Different breeds of rabbits have different temperaments, so do your research first. Himalayan and Dutch rabbits are good for children.

No. A rabbit’s diet needs to be 80% grass or hay, 15% fresh vegetable and 5% nuggets.

Yes. Rabbits are very social animals and if left alone for long periods of time do suffer. Rabbits are best kept in pairs or groups so they don’t get lonely. Neutering rabbits is highly recommended to prevent unwanted kits (babies). Contrary to popular belief rabbits should not be kept with guinea pigs. Rabbits will often bully guinea pigs.

Our Work

Some of our patients that we have had the pleasure to treat